5 LinkedIn Profile Writing Tips

grammar-chic-linkedin-writing-tips-blog

 

The job seeking marketplace has changed significantly, especially as you consider how technology has developed and just how many actual candidates are searching for employment. Seeing as I often instruct and write on resume-related topics, it seems only fair that I also mention LinkedIn. Today, while it might go without saying that in order for you to get the job of your dreams your resume needs to be seriously top notch, the same can be said about your LinkedIn profile. Recruiters are commonly taking to searching for candidates via this social network, and sometimes this is the first place these professionals go to post new opportunities and connect with job seekers. If you are in the middle of a job search, you can’t afford not to have consistency across these two platforms—namely your hard copy resume and what a potential employer might read about you on LinkedIn.

How Do I Create a LinkedIn Profile Worth Reading?

Just as there are rules for resume writing, the same is true with LinkedIn profile creation. As you begin to contemplate your LinkedIn profile, consider these tips.

  1. List every job you have held. While it’s true that it’s okay to be selective on your resume, the exact opposite is the case on LinkedIn. Why, you ask? Because recruiters will often search for a candidate based on where they have worked in the past. If this isn’t included on your profile, you won’t be found. Therefore, while you may have shortened your hard copy resume so that you do not present a veritable tome to a potential employer, expand upon your past on your LinkedIn profile.
  2. Write about all of your past positions. While this might seem like a serious time commitment, going back and rehashing all of the professional details from every job you have held, this is absolutely necessary when completing a LinkedIn profile. The reason for this is because what you write will contain keywords that will help you be found. Plus, just like on a resume, someone who is viewing and considering your profile wants to know your past successes and accomplishments.
  3. Fill in the section that outlines “specialties.” This is a keyword-focused area of LinkedIn and it’s incredibly important when you consider how a recruiter searches on the platform. Think about this area carefully and how it applies to your career. Do your due diligence in filling in as many competencies and proficiencies as possible. In order to do this correctly, it’s best if you take a bit of time and look for commonly used words and phrases that relate to your industry.
  4. Effectively edit your sub-header. When you first begin on LinkedIn, you will likely enter your current job first. Therefore, LinkedIn will place this directly underneath your name on the profile. So, unless your job title is really impressive, you need to edit it so it attracts attention. For instance, “John Doe, Sales Representative for ABC Company” is not overly striking, but “John Doe, Revenue Generating Extraordinaire and Consultative Sales Expert” could raise some eyebrows and communicate what you might be able to bring to a company.
  5. Create a personal URL. LinkedIn will automatically generate a seemingly generic URL for your profile when you start your account. This is bound to look something like: http://www.linkedin.com/johnd8976890. This URL is designed so a visitor can access your profile directly without searching for you and it is also a Web address that many job seekers choose to put on their hard copy resume. Ultimately, you can change and personalize this URL so you can both simplify it and stand out. For instance: www.linkedin.com/amandaclarkgrammarchic. Not only is this a direct match, but it also includes my company’s name, which is how many people search for me. So from an external Web standpoint, my LinkedIn profile is likely to be found on a regular search. LinkedIn, as a social network, ranks really well on the search engines, so doing this can help ensure that you are on page one of Google for your name.

In today’s digital age, it’s fine to have a great resume that you email or hand directly to a potential employer, but you also must make sure that your online profile is doing its job as well and presenting you in an attractive light.
Source : http://www.business2community.com/linkedin/5-linkedin-profile-writing-tips-0379108#Qpkzu8vj6Q2U5CAk.99

5 Essential Social Media Tips For Your Job Hunt

The new year will be here before we know it and college seniors will soon be taking to the streets, heading to web and networking events in hopes of landing a job post-graduation. Any modern job search requires more than just a resume and portfolio, however. Here are five essential social media tips from creative staffing agency, Vitamin T, which job seekers should consider when embarking on their job search.

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Use keywords

Searching for a person online is like searching for a book in Powell’s and not knowing the author. It is important to use keywords in your LinkedIn, Twitter, Google+ and other social media bios so you are easier to find. If you’re a front-end developer, you want to come up when employers or recruiters are searching for HTML, CSS, etc. on LinkedIn. Think about the skills you use every day and the things that make you great at your job, and make sure they are listed in your bio. For Twitter, you want someone to come to your profile and immediately know who you are, what you do and why they should hire you. They’ll scan your feed, so make sure it’s true to what you’re claiming in your bio. If your keywords say one thing and your feed says another, you’re not likely to look credible.

Google yourself

Because your potential employers will. There is nothing worse than walking into an interview and having an employer tell you something about yourself you didn’t know was out there. Google has a long memory, but if you’re prepared, you can preempt any confusion without surprise. Again—keywords in your bios will help better control what people are finding.

Connect with potential employers

Don’t just listen, talk. Retweet their tweets, comment on their posts, share their posts and tag them in posts. Every time you engage with a potential employer online, it is another chance for you to be noticed, and maybe even become their next hire. At the very least, listen. Know what potential employers are talking about on social media so you can bring it up in a potential interview. You might not retweet every tweet, but they’ll know you are paying attention.

Mind your manners

Be mindful of the language you are using and the opinions you are sharing publicly. You never want to say anything that would offend a potential employer. When someone is considering you for a job, they are considering you to represent their brand/company. It is hard to change a negative first impression, so control your online presence by only sharing things you want Google to remember. Keep in mind, if you retweet something someone else posted it still reflects on you. So think before you post.

Keep it human

Be yourself. You aren’t a robot. Humanize your feeds. It’s important to have conversations and engage with others, but it’s also alright to talk about things that are not related to your job. Do you like watching sports, have a cooking blog or sit on a community board? Talk about it! You don’t have to tell everyone what you’re having for every meal, but employers like to know you’re multifaceted.

 Taken from: http://bostinno.com/2012/12/08/5-essential-social-media-tips-for-your-job-hunt/

5 Ways to lose your dream job during the interview process

Mona Abdel-Halim is the co-founder of Resunate, the makers of the Apply widget for startups. You can start attracting top talent free by getting an Apply widget for your company at Resunate.com/employers. Connect with Resunate on Facebook and Twitter.

If you’ve been on the job search for a while, it’s likely you have a good idea of things you should be doing to land a new job, such as optimizing your resume or building your personal brand online. Of course, you can’t get the job if you don’t make a great impression on your interviewer or potential employer.

But there are also plenty of ways you can ruin your chances of getting a new job. It may seem obvious, but you’d be surprised how many people kill their chances before they’ve even left their interview. If you’re hoping to land your dream job, here’s what not to do during the job hunt.

1. Blow Off the Phone Interview

If your resume makes it past an employer’s applicant tracking system and impresses the hiring manager, it’s likely you’ll be invited for a phone interview. This is how employers whittle down their list of applicants to decide who they want to bring in for an in-person interview — so you need to be prepared and take the opportunity seriously.

Here’s a great example of what not to do (courtesy of an anonymous employer via MyCrappyResume):

“[I] had a couple of phone screens with clearly drunken candidates. Also had a candidate sweating profusely through interviews and going to the bathroom every 5 minutes. (Word to the wise — if you’re THAT sick, reschedule!) Needless to say, none of them were hired!”

It’s also vital that you’re properly prepared for the interview. Sit in a quiet room without distractions, do your research beforehand and ensure you’re actually able to speak on the phone for the allotted time. One job candidate learned this the hard way:

“I was asked to participate in a second phone interview while I was on vacation, and because I was very interested in the job, I obliged. Before I started to answer the first question, my phone completely died. I had no way of retrieving the phone number. Needless to say, I did not get the job.”

2. Talk About Other Job Opportunities

It may sound like common sense, but some job seekers feel the need to be overly honest when interacting with potential employers. There’s always the chance that one opportunity might fall through, so don’t jeopardize one position because you think you might get another.

Obviously, employers don’t like being rebuffed, particularly when they’ve spent a lot of time reviewing your material and preparing for the interview. Here are two real stories that are almost hard to believe:

“Someone once started an interview with me by saying ‘Okay. So, just to set this straight, I did interview for another job that I’m probably going to take if I receive an offer.’”

“During the interview, an alarm clock went off from a candidate’s briefcase. He took it out, shut it off, apologized and said he had to leave for another interview.”

3. Provide TMI

Unfortunately, there are a lot of jobseekers who have had a tough time landing a new job. Whether you’re a new graduate, an older job seeker or one of the long-term unemployed, it’s likely that you’ve had your fair share of challenges on the hunt for a new position. Sharing these sob stories with employers, however, is not going to get you the job.

One employer tells of an awkward interview situation that illustrates the point:

“I once interviewed a woman and asked her standard interview questions, such as ‘What do you need from a boss?’ To this question, she replied: ‘I need my boss to be my best friend. I’m so lonely. We just moved here a few months ago, and I haven’t made any friends. I need a friend.’”

4. Talk Negatively About Former Supervisors or Positions

It’s easy to blame your former supervisor for issues you faced in the workplace. Sure, venting to a friend or family member can make you feel less angry, but do not bring it into a new job. Applicants who speak negatively about former positions, management or colleagues are not perceived positively by employers — it can often raise a red flag in their eyes if you’re so quick to dish the dirt. In one instance, a candidate spoke badly of customers to his interviewer and ruined his chances of landing the job:

“I was interviewing a young man for a customer service position. He had worked at a hair salon, and in describing his experience there, he said, ‘I had to deal with a lot of old biddies.’ Needless to say, that’s where his candidacy ended.”

5. Act Cocky

Confidence is key on the job search, but cockiness is less than appealing. You certainly don’t want to sound like this jobseeker:

“One time a candidate said he was so well-qualified that if he didn’t get the job, it would prove that the company’s management was incompetent.”

Taken from: http://mashable.com/2012/04/22/job-search-mistakes/

5 User-Friendly Tools for Building Your Online Portfolio

 

April 15, 2012 by 10

Social Media Money

Heather R. Huhman is the founder and president of Come Recommended, a content marketing and digital PR consultancy for organizations with products that target job seekers and/or employers. You can connect with Heather and Come Recommended on Twitter and Facebook.

In today’s digital world, your job search has to be as much online as it is on paper. Social media platforms such asLinkedInTwitter and Facebook can help you establish your personal employment brand and connect with potential employers — in fact, almost 90% of employers are using social media to recruit potential employees [PDF]. What better way to have all of your online and offline job search tools in one place than in a portfolio?

An online portfolio allows you to compile what makes you employable — it should include things like your resume, cover letter, references, certifications, transcripts and any examples of your work (including writing samples, press clips, artwork or lesson plans). Plus, you should include basic contact information, such as a phone number and email, and more modern information, like a Twitter handle, LinkedIn profile, or Facebook URL. Put all of this into one online package that’s easy to browse and voilà — you have an online portfolio!

Here are five great options that can host your online portfolio. There’s a breakdown of each one, so you can pick which one works best for you and your career goals.


1. WorkSimple


 

 

Summary: WorkSimple is the first work portfolio that helps you manage your career and performance inside your organization. Users have endorsements, followers, goals and accomplishments, which can help you build your professional and social reputations. Set your professional focus, add your goals, and get recognition for your work.

Additionally, WorkSimple allows users to brand themselves by sharing goals and contributions with co-workers in real-time. Essentially, it’s a Facebook Timeline for professionals.

Best Feature: WorkSimple encourages you to set career focus and add “Social Goals” that support your direction, which help you keep track of your accomplishments, efforts and successes as you build your reputation. Plus, you can get great feedback from co-workers.

What Needs Work: Those looking for a traditional portfolio to display resume, work samples and more may not find these features in WorkSimple.

Ideal User: A corporate worker who is tech-savvy and wants to establish goals and stay synced with co-workers. Like the other portfolio platforms, you can add images, but this portfolio is not solely image-based.

Cost: Free for an individual plan but pricing plans exist for team or company plans.


2. Behance


 

 

Summary: Behance is a platform for creative professionals to gain exposure and manage their careers. Users can create multimedia portfolios that showcase their work to millions of visitors.

Best Feature: Behance turns your work into an online gallery; It claims to get 15 times the traffic of all other leading portfolio sites combined (including Carbonmade, the next site on our list). Recruiters can find and track talent and post jobs for the creative professionals on the site.

What Needs Work: In order to have your own personal portfolio website, rather than just a profile on Behance, you need to join ProSite. This costs $11 a month, but it allows you to create a full website without coding, and it syncs with your Behance portfolio.

Ideal User: Any creative professional wishing to showcase multimedia projects — images, text, audio or video. The layout of the site is better for viewing visual projects, so anyone from graphic designers to photographers to industrial designers can benefit.

Cost: Free for a Behance profile, $11 a month for the ProSite.


3. Carbonmade


 

 

Summary: Carbonmade is an online portfolio platform that helps users show off their work — especially creative work like design, illustration and art.

Best Feature: Carbonmade makes portfolios easy. Users can create a profile in a snap, and the service offers tons of ways to personalize your portfolio. Plus, users can establish their own URL — for example, yourname.carbonmade.com.

What Needs Work: The site isn’t conducive to any text, audio or video work — a still image is best for this portfolio.

Ideal User: Again, this portfolio service is primarily for creative professionals. In comparison to Behance, Carbonmade seems even more geared toward visual art. Any professional who can share an image of their work — fashion designers, illustrators, architects and more — would find Carbonmade useful.

Cost: Free


4. Pinterest


 

 

Summary: Pinterest is basically an online pin-board. It’s primarily a social photo-sharing website where users can create separate boards for various things. For example, you could have a board for recipes, pictures of places you’d like to travel or, in this case, your professional creative work.

Best Feature: Pinterest is far more social than Behance or Carbonmade, so you can have eyes from all parts of the globe on your work. Plus, you can “pin” any image, and when users click on a pinned image, they’re redirected to the original website. For example, if you “pinned” a piece of your artwork from, say, your personal blog, you can attract more traffic to your blog.

What Needs Work: The platform was not made to be a professional portfolio site. Therefore, the site may have a different audience of viewers than an actual portfolio platform. Plus, like Carbonmade, text or audio works cannot be “pinned.”

Ideal User: Pinterest only allows photos or videos (which will be “pinned” as a still picture), so creative professionals with image-based work will find this site most useful. Any professional with visual work that can be put into image form can display their portfolio on Pinterest.

Cost: Free, but you do need to request an invite.


5. Dribbble


 

 

Summary: Dribbble is a “show and tell” for designers, where users can share small screenshots of their work.

Best Feature: The platform shows off your work with screenshots of your progress or completed project. Plus, it’s easy to browse other people’s work by tags or color.

What Needs Work: Dribbble isn’t useful for anyone with non-visual works; it’s really only conducive to visuals.

Ideal User: Anyone who creates visual work that can be shared via an image, especially graphic or web designers, illustrators and logo designers.

Cost: Free


Conclusion


All online portfolio platforms have their pros and cons, and different sites work better for varying types of professionals in myriad industries. There are many portfolio services to explore aside from the ones mentioned above, but what all of these sites have in common is that they allow professionals to display their work online and continue to build their personal brand.

Taken from:http://mashable.com/2012/04/15/online-portfolio-tools/