Tips for a More Successful Social Media Marketing Strategy

40% of people say they socialize more often online than face-to-face. This ever-evolving dependence on the digital world sets up businesses for success in all realms – both through search and social and in terms of how online customers translate offline.

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Social media, in particular, reaches an impressive magnitude of consumers. In fact, as technology continues to advance, ignoring social networking isn’t an option for businesses who want to succeed – or even survive. A presence is necessary not only in the form of a basic Google profile, but also on Facebook, Twitter and more.

In a Social Media Marketing Industry Report, 83% of marketers said that social media is important to their business. The top benefits reported from utilizing networks include: business exposure, an increase in traffic and market insight.

It was reported that niche targeting and measurement (ROI) were two of the major focuses in which to improve moving forward. Video-based social media marketing is increasingly important as well – meaning YouTube will give Facebook, Twitter and Pinterest a run for their top spots.

Time invested in social media does not have to be extraordinary. 74% of brand marketers saw an increase in website traffic after investing just 6 hours per week on social networks. To help you get started, we’ve compiled a list of goals in which to aim for in managing social media content.

  1. Communicate your message – Work with team members to create a company voice and mission statement; this is how you will present your brand across networks.
  2. Organize a content schedule – A basic weekly outline is beneficial in identifying relevant topics and images for your business. This should include trending, timely information and responses.
  3. Engage CURRENT fans, followers, customers, etc. – Build loyalty with those already interested, and they will share your content, raising awareness and bringing in new potential leads. Posts should be consistent in timing but varied in content.
  4. Target posts accordingly – Different audiences require different messages. Each network presents the power to reach a new target group, and it can be further broken down by niche interests and industries. (Facebook groups, location-targeting, Google+ circles and communities, etc.)
  5. Invest in available resources – Cross-promotion allows you to promote your own site content on social networks, for example. There are many tools on the web that help make it easier to schedule and measure content posted.
  6. Keep an eye on your competition – Social media presents an invaluable opportunity to check out what others like you are doing. This gives insight into customer interests as well – why are competitors attracting more? What are they not doing that you can take advantage of?

For further insight into social media marketing, contact us today.

Source: http://smallbusiness.yahoo.com/advisor/tips-more-successful-social-media-marketing-strategy-133051411.html

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Essential social media advice for B2B companies

Here are some things the B2B world can learn from B2C social media best practices:

Devise a clear strategy before you dive in (and update yours if you’re already in the water). 

It’s not enough for a business to just “be there” when it comes to social media, and that applies to consumer brands and B2B companies. There have to be good reasons for you to engage in the media you’re using.

Ask yourself these questions, and perhaps even poll your customers or members to get clear answers:

• Is my intended audience already on Facebook/Twitter/LinkedIn? This question will become especially relevant when you’re deciding which social media channels your company should use. Chances are your customer base is using LinkedIn, so that should be a no-brainer. It gets a little trickier with Facebook, Twitter, and Google+. It’s even trickier to determine whether your customer base will want to find you in emerging social media sites such as Pinterest and Instagram.

• How is my audience using different social media channels? This takes the previous question a step further. Your customer base may be using Facebook and Twitter to connect with friends and family, but are they also using it for networking or professional reasons? If your customers are on Facebook, but most are not using it to connect with companies for business purposes, that social media avenue may not be a priority. That’s not to say you shouldn’t be there; it’s only to say that you should prioritize the spaces your customers are using for professional reasons.

• What are my benchmarks for success in social media? We establish our benchmarks by taking a look first at how like-minded organizations are succeeding in social media. If we’re trailblazing, our goals will be less number-based and more anecdotally focused. We’ll want to listen first and make adjustments as we go. Eventually, our benchmark may be that our Facebook page is the first point of contact for the majority of our consumers—whether they’re inquiring about products or reaching out for customer-service purposes.

• Do we have the ability to effectively measure our success in the social space?If you don’t have the metrics to tell you how you’re performing against the benchmarks you’ve set for success, it will be difficult to justify increased spending on social media. You should measure more than just “likes” and “follows” month over month; you should be measuring engagement.

Don’t sound so corporate. 

It’s easy to tell social media managers to develop a distinctive voice in social media, but it’s tough to make it happen—especially when you’re writing for B2B. Inherently, these companies are less likely to have an overarching voice to rely on.

If you’re managing the social media presence for, say, Frosted Flakes, you have a built-in voice: Everything’s “grrrrrreat!” There are also layers of legal approval that you have to maneuver before a post goes up, so it’s likely that any semblance of voice could be lost in that process.

Don’t let it discourage you. If your company doesn’t have an agreed-upon voice, make it your own. Be conversational, but most of all be brief.

I’ve seen so many B2B organizations that feel every post needs to be a paragraph long. In my experience working with B2C brands, I consistently see that the more concise posts consistently garner higher engagement rates.

It sounds basic, but always respond to anyone who posts on your wall. We make this a point with our B2C brands, and B2Bs should be doing the same—even if it’s just to say “thanks for posting.”

Taken from: http://www.prdaily.com/Main/Articles/Essential_social_media_advice_for_B2B_companies_10819.aspx